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Orchids of the Rainforest

Ram Anand
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Geetha’s seemingly perfect world is shattered when she loses her husband of five years, forcing her into a period of introspection.

Her younger brother- Yuva- has to confront his own prejudices as his relationship with his partner gradually crumbles by the day.

Sabitha- their cousin and the youngest of the three- is about to reveal a secret that she had kept from her family for many years- and has to live with the repercussions.

As they deal with their personal troubles, the cousins encounter and bond with other Malaysian Indians who are trying to break the shackles of tradition.

Together, they attempt to reconcile their identities with their culture and heritage- while realising that acceptance is sometimes found in the unlikeliest of places.

Published: May/2021

ISBN: 9789814914031

Length: 288 Pages

Orchids of the Rainforest

Ram Anand

Geetha’s seemingly perfect world is shattered when she loses her husband of five years, forcing her into a period of introspection.

Her younger brother- Yuva- has to confront his own prejudices as his relationship with his partner gradually crumbles by the day.

Sabitha- their cousin and the youngest of the three- is about to reveal a secret that she had kept from her family for many years- and has to live with the repercussions.

As they deal with their personal troubles, the cousins encounter and bond with other Malaysian Indians who are trying to break the shackles of tradition.

Together, they attempt to reconcile their identities with their culture and heritage- while realising that acceptance is sometimes found in the unlikeliest of places.

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Ram Anand

Ram Anand is a Malaysian journalist, filmmaker, and author of Rainforest Unicorns. He wrote and directed the Indian short film Dusk, and has also worked on Malaysian television episodes and stage plays. He holds an MA in Film Direction from Bournemouth University, UK. Ram has spent the past decade writing extensively about Malaysian affairs in various local and regional publications. He currently writes for The Straits Times. He lives in Kuala Lumpur, having conceded that he would never resolve his identity crisis as a third-generation Malaysian Telugu, and because there’s no substitute for Malaysian food.